All bran

Need help or advice on feeding your Schnauzer, whether it be kibble or treats, you'll find the information here. There is food reviews, recipes, remedies for poorly tummies and a wealth of feeding knowledge from your fellow Schnauzer owner. We cover BARF in a separate section.
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Maddogfan
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Joined: 26 Jul 2013, 19:35
First Name: Steffie
Dog #1: Lincoln
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 May 2013

All bran

Post by Maddogfan »

Hey everyone. I was wondering if anyone can give me advice. Lincoln anal glands have been leaking on and off for a while now .It not that pleasure when he is up on your knee or laying beside u and start leaking the smell is not the nicest lol. I have read online that adding all bran can help stop the leaking. He has been get it add to his dinner for a week now and if anything his poo has got softer. Just found out tonight that you get different type of all bran so look and he has be getting the wheat all bran. Any help or advice on what best I should do would be greatly appreciate. Have post on the health page as well so see if anyone can help :)

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zeta1454
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Re: All bran

Post by zeta1454 »

Hi Steffie - you may need to have Lincoln checked out by a vet to be sure there is not an issue that needs dealing with apart from his diet. However, anal gland problems can be due to food. Dry food (kibble ) often contains some sort of bran already so you may want to check the ingredients of his current food if he is fed dry food. We feed our dogs raw meat with a small amount of vegetables added (prepared food from a raw food for dogs company) and have never had the type of problem you describe. There is an article here which may help explain the problem of just adding bran / cereals to a dog’s diet:

https://dogsfirst.ie/health-issues/anal-glands-in-dogs/
Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole. ~Roger Caras

Magic - Silversocks Sharade at Darksprite
Trilby - Darksprite Rosa Bud


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Maddogfan
Puppy
Posts: 21
Joined: 26 Jul 2013, 19:35
First Name: Steffie
Dog #1: Lincoln
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 May 2013

Re: All bran

Post by Maddogfan »

Hey. Lincoln get bit of raw beef everyday. He is feed royal canin miniature schnauzer food

Oscar 12345
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Re: All bran

Post by Oscar 12345 »

Steffie, to add to Leigh's comments above. If you are feeding some raw everyday I would switch to a raw diet, one that has bone in it, there are lots of companies who supplier raw complete foods. Firm stools should sort out anal gland problems (unless as Leigh pointed out there is some other underlying problem). When Otto was a pup, his glands used to leak a little especially when he was sitting on my knee.... urgh. Never had a problem whilst on raw in fact I can see the glands working properly when he has a poop.
Man cannot survive with wine alone...
we also need a schnauzer.

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zeta1454
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Joined: 19 May 2011, 16:58
First Name: Leigh
Dog #1: Magic
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 20 Apr 2010
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is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 15 Mar 2012
Dog #3: Pip
Born: 21 Feb 2014
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Location: North Yorkshire
Contact:

Re: All bran

Post by zeta1454 »

I agree with Julie that if you are already giving Lincoln raw meat, it would be worth switching him to a raw diet completely and see if that helps with the anal issues. You can DIY raw feeding if you are confident in making up the meals from basic meats to give a broad range of nutrients or buy ready prepared meat or ‘complete’ meals from a raw food for dogs company.

Royal Canin has established financial links with certain vet surgeries to promote their food but it is not high quality and the RC Miniature Schnauzer kibble scores only 29% for nutritional value on the All About Dog Food website:

https://www.allaboutdogfood.co.uk/dog-f ... uzer-adult

Checking the ingredient list, although there are some good supplementary ingredients, it is high in vegetable / grains and the generalised terms mean you don’t know specifically what meat or vegetables are used to a large extent.

“Rice, dehydrated poultry protein, maize, vegetable protein isolate*, maize gluten, animal fats, hydrolysed animal proteins, minerals, chicory pulp, fish oil, vegetable fibres, fructo-oligo-saccharides, psyllium husks and seeds, soya oil, borage oil, hydrolysed crustaceans (source of glucosamine), marigold extract (source of lutein), hydrolysed cartilage (source of chondroitin)

These are the comments on some of the more ambiguous ingredients in the RC miniature schnauzer kibble from the AllAbout Dog Food glossary:

Vegetable protein extract (or isolate) is another term that doesn't shed any real light on what is in the food. It gives no indication of which vegetables are used, nor does it say how the protein is extracted, although the most common methods involve chemical reactions that are far from what most people would regard as 'natural'.
For dogs, vegetable proteins are nutritionally inferior to those found in meat. Common sources of vegetable protein include soya, maize and wheat which have all been linked to dietary intolerance and, in our opinion, should be avoided with sensitive dogs.
Some nutritionists have also speculated that vegetable protein extracts might also be a pseudonym for MSG (monosodium glutamate), the controversial food additive that some believe to be mildly addictive.

Maize gluten (sometimes called maize gluten meal, corn gluten or prairie meal) is a by-product of maize processing and can be used to top-up the protein levels of dog foods, usually as an alternative to more expensive meat-proteins. Unfortunately, maize gluten protein is not as easy for dogs to deal with as protein from meat sources and as a result it can lead to health issues like skin problems and hyperactivity. For this reason, we would recommend steering clear of maize gluten, especially with sensitive dogs.

In general, animal fats are produced as a by-product of meat meal production. When the meat is heated and ground, the fats melt and are drained away. The resulting dry meat meal powder is therefore relatively low in fat so most dog foods that use meat meal have added fat to bring the levels back up.
Dogs also really like the taste of fat so it is tempting for manufacturers to add a little more than is strictly needed to make their foods that little bit more appealing. Unfortunately, as we all know, too much fat can cause all sorts of problems so if you notice your dog is starting to put on a little too much weight, you may want to consider a food with a lower fat content.
The problem with ambiguous terms like 'animal fats' or 'animal oils' is that they could refer to literally any fat of any quality from any animal. This allows the manufacturer to alter the recipe between batches depending on what fats are cheaper at the time. As always, we recommend looking for foods where the sources of the fats and oils are clearly stated.

With raw meat and vegetables you will know exactly what you are feeding and no additives or vague general supplements. The food should naturally contain all the nutrients a dog needs. If you do want a guide to raw feeding, the following link may help:

http://www.rawfeedingrebels.com/raw-fee ... ter-guide/
Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole. ~Roger Caras

Magic - Silversocks Sharade at Darksprite
Trilby - Darksprite Rosa Bud


https://m.facebook.com/pages/category/C ... 916994967/

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