Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Pictures of all our other pet family or friends and help and advice on photographing our Schnauzers.
User avatar
Mike Jackson
Member
Posts: 839
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 19:54
First Name: Mike
Dog #1: Boris
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Born: 12 Dec 2013
Dog #2: Bertie
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 Jul 2009
Dog #3: Arthur
Born: 08 May 2011
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Location: Hastings, East Sussex
Contact:

Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by Mike Jackson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:26

As anyone sensible enjoys looking at pictures of schnauzers and more people are upgrading their cameras I though I'd have a go at sharing some of the knowledge I've gained over the last few years and hopefully help people to take even better pictures. This is information that I've read and learnt by experience but it is by no means exhaustive or even completely correct. I've taught a few courses and helped people with their photography over the years and I find it a lot easier to explain things to people face to face but here@s my attempt at putting some of it in writing.

I may well have got some things wrong and you may disagree with some of the things I've written. You may have different techniques that work for you. Don't be shy, criticise or enhance what I've written and we will all be rewarded with even more wonderful schnauzer pictures.

I'll break the post up into a few sections as I've rambled on quite a bit.

User avatar
Mike Jackson
Member
Posts: 839
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 19:54
First Name: Mike
Dog #1: Boris
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Born: 12 Dec 2013
Dog #2: Bertie
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 Jul 2009
Dog #3: Arthur
Born: 08 May 2011
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Location: Hastings, East Sussex
Contact:

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Mike Jackson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:27

IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

Step 1 – Understand your camera.
Too many people get a new camera, take it out of the box, start using it and are then disappointed with the results. The first rule with any new camera purchase is RTFM if you want to get the best out of it. So what is RTFM? Read The Flipping Manual. Don’t just flick through it once though, if you’re not sure of something refer back to it, there’s no shame in having to check the manual. Better that than missing a great shot.

Now you know where all the buttons are, it’s time to understand what they all do. Most DSLRs will have something called a command dial on the top or back which is a dial with little pictograms and letters on. This used to select the shooting mode. If your camera doesn’t have a command dial you will still be able to access these shooting modes but it may be through a menu or various buttons. As you’ve just read the manual you’ll know how to change the shooting mode on your camera.

These shooting modes are often grouped into two sections the Auto modes and the Creative modes.

We’ll start with the Auto modes. In these modes you tell the camera what you’re going to shoot and it will set everything for you. The common modes are:-

Full auto – The basic point and shoot mode, you point the camera at something at the camera takes its best guess at what you want to shoot and it will choose the settings for you. If you’re not sure what you are going to take pictures of and are unsure of how to quickly change the settings on your camera leave it in full auto and at least you’ll get a picture. Maybe not the best picture possible but at least you’ve got a record of the event.

Portrait – Generally used when you’re taking a shot of someone or something and you want the background out of focus. Don’t get hung up on the word portrait, it doesn’t have to be used just for portraits of people. If you see a nice flower and want it to stand out from the background use portrait mode.

Sport – Used to capture fast action. If your dog is running fast you could use this mode to capture the picture.

Landscape – Does what it says on the tin. If you see some nice scenery and what a picture put the camera in landscape mode and it will take a picture with most of the scene in focus.

Macro – This is the mode you use when you want to take a close up picture of something, it allows you to get really close.

Now let’s look at the Creative Modes. In the creative modes you have full control over the ISO and when to use flash etc. and set one or more variables exactly how you want them.

Program – A more creative version of full auto. You set the ISO and whether or not you want a flash and the camera will choose a shutter/aperture combination to ensure a good exposure. The settings can be varied but the relationship between the shutter speed and aperture will be maintained to ensure a good exposure is obtained. A lot of people like to leave their camera in this mode to ensure they get a reasonably exposed shot if they grab the camera and shoot.

Shutter Priority – You choose the shutter speed and the camera will choose the aperture to give a correct exposure. Often used for sports work where you need a minimum shutter speed to capture the action but also useful if you want long exposures at night etc.

Aperture Priority – You set the aperture and the camera selects a shutter speed. This is one of the more creative and useful modes in my opinion. Changing the aperture alters the amount of light hitting the sensor and the Depth of Field. More on this later.

Manual – You set everything. Supposedly the mode that you should use if you want to be a proper photographer because you take full control. Of great use when you are shooting in fixed light conditions but don’t get hung up on having to use manual. Most professional photographers shoot in aperture priority more than they do manual.

Some cameras will have other modes available, have a read of the manual to see what they do.

Okay so that’s the various shooting modes but what do the other settings do?

ISO – this used to be the film speed and the same system has been transferred to digital. The higher the number the lower light you can shoot in. This sounds fairly straight forward but it’s never as easy as it seems. The problem is that as the ISO gets higher the quality starts to diminish. In compact and lower end cameras this quality will drop off fairly quickly but on the top end models the quality will still be there at quite high ISO settings. Try shooting with different ISO settings and see what point the quality of your camera starts to get unacceptable.

Focus – All cameras will have the standard one shot focus mode where the camera focusses on the subject as you take the picture. Many will also have focus lock where you focus on a subject and half press the shutter and this locks the focus and allows you to re-compose the picture whilst keeping the main subject in focus. Very handy when the main subject is not in the centre of the frame. Moving on from here, as the cameras get better they will also have a focus mode that tracks moving objects, known as AI Servo on Canon cameras. This allows the focus to lock onto an object and follow it whilst you take the picture. Some cameras will have multiple focus points and allow you to select which focus point to use. Top end cameras have over 50 separate focus points.

Drive modes – This harks back to the film days when motor dives were first launched. One shot means that you press the shutter button and the camera takes one picture. Some cameras have a continuous shooting mode that when you press the shutter button and keep it depressed the camera keeps taking pictures until it’s maximum setting (or the memory card fills up). There may also be subdivisions of this mode that vary the speed. Continuous shooting is very handy when you are trying to capture action shots.

Metering modes – Cameras have a built in light meter that allows them to work out the correct exposure. You can alter the way this mode works on most cameras. Spot metering takes a reading from the focus point and works out the exposure from it. Partial metering takes the reading from a slightly larger area. Centre weighted average metering takes a reading from the whole scene but with a bias to the focus point. Evaluative metering takes a reading from the whole scene and tries to give a good exposure to the whole scene. Generally you’d use spot metering for portraits and evaluative for landscapes but experiment with the modes and see what suits you best. On many cameras you can also use exposure compensation which allows you to still use the automatic metering modes but adjust it lighter or darker if you want.

White balance – Colours look different under different lighting conditions but our brain compensates for this. Changing the white balance settings makes the processor in the camera do the same thing. If you’re not sure leave the camera in auto white balance mode and it will try its best. Also try taking pictures in different white balance modes and see what the effect is.

Picture quality – You can alter the picture quality settings on your camera. When hard drives and memory cards were expensive there was an advantage to shooting smaller lower quality pictures but with memory being so cheap now it is better to shoot in the best available quality and reduce it on the computer at home if lower quality is required. Can you imagine how gutted you’d be if you took a picture worthy of inclusion in a magazine but found that you’d taken it at too low a quality for printing.

Picture Styles – The camera will have a range of built in picture styles that you can choose from. These will alter the sharpness of the picture and the vibrancy of the colours.

File type – Most camera will shoot Jpeg files. This is a very compact file type and does a good job but is known as a lossy format. The processor in the camera creates the file but in the process discards some of the information. Others will shoot Tiff files which are much larger files and keep more of the information. More and more cameras are now allowing you to shoot in Raw format. This is the cameras native format and contains all of the information that the camera sees. The advantages of shooting in raw are that you get to apply all of the picture styles, white balance adjustments on the computer at home rather than relying on the camera to do it. The disadvantage is that you need to convert the file to another format (usually Jpeg) to enable it to be seen by other people and printed etc. Most cameras will have their own raw format which is not compatible with other camera raw formats. If your camera is capable of shooting raw files the bundled software will normally contain some programs to carry out editing and conversion of raw files. Programs like Photoshop and elements are also capable of editing raw files but if you have a new camera you may find that the raw files are not yet supported.

User avatar
Mike Jackson
Member
Posts: 839
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 19:54
First Name: Mike
Dog #1: Boris
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Born: 12 Dec 2013
Dog #2: Bertie
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 Jul 2009
Dog #3: Arthur
Born: 08 May 2011
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Location: Hastings, East Sussex
Contact:

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Mike Jackson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:40

Step 2 – Why do I need all these different settings?

Early cameras didn’t have any of these different settings and people still managed to take pictures didn’t they? They did but they were very limited as to the pictures they could take. When people had their portrait taken in the early days they had to sit still for minutes whilst the film (or photographic plate if you want to get pedantic) was exposed or have an incredibly bright flash go off in front of them. Since the early cameras things have moved on and we now have cameras available that can capture images of speeding bullets and the tiniest microbes. Not many of us will have a camera capable of this sort of thing but our cameras have advanced in leaps and bounds and we can use these improvements to improve the quality of our photography and expand our creativity.

At its most basic form a picture is created by light falling onto a light sensitive material. It used to be film bit is now normally an electronic sensor. To vary the amount of light falling onto this sensor we have three variables that we can alter. Shutter speed, aperture and ISO.

Let’s have a look at these three things separately first and learn how they can help with our creativity.

Shutter speed – A slow shutter speed will allow plenty of light onto the sensor but if a subject is moving it will appear blurred when we look at the picture. Obviously we have to use a shutter speed that is fast enough so that objects appear stationary but there are times when we want things to appear blurred. Think of something like a helicopter or prop driven aeroplane. With a fast enough shutter speed we can freeze the movement of the blades and they will appear stationary. The trouble is they now appear to be stationary. If we slow the shutter speed down slightly so that the blades blur it will give an impression of movement. Slower shutter speeds can also help your creativity. Most people will have seen pictures of waterfalls or seascapes where the water has a milky look. This is created by using a slow shutter speed.
You can also use a slower shutter speed to make things like fairground rides more interesting.

Image
Electric by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

Another thing to bear in mind when you’re choosing a shutter speed is the risk of camera shake. If you choose a slow shutter speed you may not be able to hand hold the camera still long enough. You either need to choose a faster shutter speed or use a tripod. As a rule of thumb most people can hand hold a camera with a shutter speed that is 1 over the focal length of the lens. I.e. if you are using a 200mm lens you can hand hold at 1/200 or faster. Some people are able to hand hold at slower speeds than this and many lenses and cameras have image stabilisation features that allow you to hand hold at slower speeds.

Aperture – This is the confusing one. The larger the aperture the smaller the number! This can be a bit confusing until you look at the way that apertures are described. The correct way of stating what an aperture is f/ followed by a number. The / is the important bit here as the aperture is stated as a fraction of the focal length of a lens. Supposing you have a lens with an aperture of f/2 the aperture would be ½ of the focal length of the lens. This also explains why most zoom lenses have a variable maximum aperture, the maximum aperture is actually constant but because the focal length varies the aperture is a different fraction of the focal length.
Got it? Probably not at first but don’t worry you don’t need to know the reasons for it you just need to know what changing the aperture will do. So what does varying the aperture do? Obviously selecting a wider aperture (lower number) will let more light in so surely to get a well exposed picture we just select the widest aperture we can. This is great until you look at a mysterious thing called Depth of Field.

Depth of field is one of the most useful tools in our creative arsenal. It can also be one of the greatest banes of our life when we are trying to get the whole of a subject in focus. Depth of field is the area in front and behind of the focus point that appears to be in focus. Depth of field is dependent on the focal length of the lens, the aperture that is set, the distance to the subject and the size of the sensor on the camera. This all sounds a bit confusing but put simply the larger the aperture the smaller the depth of field, as the subject gets further away from the camera the depth of field increases. In practice this means that if I shoot a fly at f/2.8 close up barely any of it will be in focus whereas I can shoot a miniature schnauzer at f/2.8 at a distance and the whole dog will appear to be in focus. For more on Depth of Field and examples have a look at http://www.dofmaster.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Have a look at the pictures below for examples of how changing the aperture varies the depth of field.

Image
f2.8 by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

Image
f4 by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

Image
f8 by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

Image
f16 by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

Image
f32 by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

As can be seen from the pictures above a large aperture gives a small depth of field and helps to isolate the subject from the background. You need to be a wee bit careful when using very wide apertures as a slight error in focussing becomes very apparent. If you’re not 100% about your or your cameras focussing abilities then choosing a slightly narrower aperture can give you that leeway you require.
Experiment with different apertures and see what results you can get. I’ve found that with my 70-200 lens I can get good action shots of small dogs with an aperture of f/2.8 but need to select f/3.5 – f/4 when shooting larger dogs.

To summarise with apertures, small number = more light and shallow depth of field, big number = less light but large depth of field.

ISO – As I said earlier this is the equivalent of film speed. A good rule of thumb is to shoot in the lowest ISO you can and still get a fast enough shutter speed to prevent camera shake but don’t be afraid to up the ISO to enable you to get the picture. A grainy picture can sometimes be better than no picture at all. Suppose you were out walking and saw the Beast of Bodmin Moor. Without a picture no one would believe you so a grainy picture would at least prove you weren’t going round the twist. Different cameras will work better at high ISOs so take some shots at the different settings so you can see how far you can go before the pictures get too grainy.

Well that’s the three different variable but we mustn’t lose sight of the fact that it’s the combination of all three that give us the correct exposure so if you vary one you need to alter one of the others.

User avatar
Mike Jackson
Member
Posts: 839
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 19:54
First Name: Mike
Dog #1: Boris
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Born: 12 Dec 2013
Dog #2: Bertie
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 Jul 2009
Dog #3: Arthur
Born: 08 May 2011
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Location: Hastings, East Sussex
Contact:

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Mike Jackson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:42

Step 3 – Composition

Once you know how to use you camera and what all the settings do you can now get out and start snapping. If you search the internet for rules of photography you’ll find hundreds of different rules, many often contradicting each other. The important thing to remember about these “rules” is they are guidelines, as long as a picture works for you it’s fine.

The Rule of Thirds - Imagine your viewfinder is dissected by two horizontal and two vertical lines spaced evenly. The rule of thirds states that points of interest and major features should be placed at the intersections of these lines or on the lines themselves. Some cameras even come with a feature that places an overlay grid on the viewfinder to help with composing according to the rule of thirds. This is a very useful compositional guideline but don’t be afraid to ignore it if it suits you. I personally find it works very well with landscapes but with portraiture I prefer the subject in the middle.

Shoot wider – With the image sizes available on modern cameras there are plenty of spare pixels so give yourself a bit of leeway. You can always crop in a bit on the computer later and if the subject moves a bit you won’t chop off part of them. I’m frequently guilty of framing a shot too close and regretting it later. This shot would have been a cracker if I’d got both of the dogs fully in frame.

Image
CQ9R9590 by Mike Jackson1, on Flickr

Give your subject room to move – If the subject is moving from one side of the picture to the other leave more room in front of them. It emphasises the action.

Shoot at the same level as your subject – If you can get down to the same level as your subject it will make it look more dramatic. If you look at me when I’m taking shots I’m frequently kneeling or even lying down. Laying down and shooting up towards the subject can make it even more impressive. I like to do this if I’m shooting dogs going over jumps it makes the jump seem even bigger. If you shoot down at your subject it will diminish it although this can have the effect of making subjects like dogs appear cute. (Or even cuter in the case of a schnauzer). This works especially well for puppies.

The important thing is not to be afraid to experiment. If the technique works for you use it.

User avatar
Mike Jackson
Member
Posts: 839
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 19:54
First Name: Mike
Dog #1: Boris
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Born: 12 Dec 2013
Dog #2: Bertie
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 Jul 2009
Dog #3: Arthur
Born: 08 May 2011
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Location: Hastings, East Sussex
Contact:

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Mike Jackson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:43

Step 4 – Flash Photography.

Once you’ve mastered the art of photography using natural light it’s time to move onto the mysterious art of flash photography.
For this you need to delve into the camera manual again as not all cameras handle flash the same way.

Effectively there are two ways of using flash.

1. When you using the flash as the main source of light. This can be because there is insufficient light or you want full control over the light in a studio environment.

2. When you are using flash to supplement the natural or ambient light. This is generally known as fill flash and is used to enhance the closer subjects and allows you to shoot things in shade (i.e. when some one has their back to the sun and their face is in the shade). I’ll frequently use this method when the day is overcast or rainy to make my subjects stand out from the background.

Flash is a quite a complicated subject and rather than go into much more detail here I’ll recommend that you have look at http://strobist.blogspot.co.uk/2006/03/ ... g-101.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

If you’ve got a DSLR I also recommend the Speedliters Handbook – Learning to craft light with Canon Speedlites by Syl Arena. Although this is based around Canon cameras it is an excellent read and useful for anyone looking to improve their flash photography.

There are a couple of issues with using flashes that most people will experience at some point.

1. Red eye (or green eye in dogs) – This is such a prevalent problem that most photo retouching software has a dedicated red eye removal tool. This is caused by the flash being too close to the lens. This is why it is more prevalent on cameras using a built in flash. The further away from the lens the flash is the less chance there is of red eye. This is a major reason for upgrading to a separate flash gun as well as the extra power available.

2. Flat images – When a flash fires directly at a subject it tends to create a shadowless image which doesn’t show much depth. If you can get the flash off to one side it will create a few shadows and give the image greater depth. This can be achieved by using an off camera flash cord and hand holding the flash to one side or using a flash bracket mounted to the tripod screw. You’ll often see wedding photographers using flash brackets to move the flash off centre.

User avatar
Mike Jackson
Member
Posts: 839
Joined: 16 Apr 2012, 19:54
First Name: Mike
Dog #1: Boris
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Born: 12 Dec 2013
Dog #2: Bertie
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 14 Jul 2009
Dog #3: Arthur
Born: 08 May 2011
is a: B/S Mini Dog
Location: Hastings, East Sussex
Contact:

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Mike Jackson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:44

F.A.Q.

My shot is all blurry what’s the cause – There are two main causes for this , the shot isn’t properly focussed or camera shake. Make sure that you are correctly focussed or using the correct focussing mode. Camera shake will be caused when the shutter is open for longer than you can effectively hold the camera still. For longer exposures of stationary objects think about using a tripod.

My camera seem to take the picture ages after I press the shutter release – This is known as shutter lag, all cameras suffer from it to a degree but generally the higher the specification of the camera the shorter the shutter lag duration. This can be a problem when trying to shoot action shots but it can be overcome with a bit of practice. Firstly you need to know how long the shutter lag is. Try pressing the shutter and timing how long until the shutter opens. You don’t need to be accurate about this, try finding a word that yu can say that takes the same amount of time as the shutter lag. Once you know the shutter lag of your camera you can then anticipate where the subject will be in that time. It’s easier to explain this with an example. Imagine you want to take a picture of your dog going over an agility jump. You’ve worked out that your camera shutter will go off 0.44 secs after the button is pressed, you could use a stop watch but it takes me 0.44 secs to say banana. Now watch the dog jump a few times and work out where the dog is banana before the jump. Now put a mark at this point pre focus on the jump and press the shutter when the dog reached the mark. Hopefully you’ll get some decent shots this way. You’ll feel a bit of a plonker shouting banana as your dog runs towards a jump so I’d recommend practising this in private. After a while you’ll get a feeling for the timings and be able to anticipate the correct time to press the shutter release.

My camera doesn’t take very good pictures should I buy a new one? – It’s a common misconception that spending more money on a camera will enable you to take better pictures. Before you spend out on a new camera make sure that you are making the best of your existing one and investigate what about the camera is holding you back. There’s no point in buying a new camera if it suffers from the same deficiencies as your old one. If you use a camera with interchangeable lenses you will often see a better improvement by upgrading the lenses than by upgrading the camera.

User avatar
Robert Lockwood
Member
Posts: 601
Joined: 02 Mar 2012, 16:59
First Name: ROBERT

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Robert Lockwood » 24 Jun 2012, 21:47

Great post Mike and rest assured -I WILL RTFM !

User avatar
Judi Ibbotson
Member
Posts: 1228
Joined: 30 Jul 2011, 14:28
First Name: Judi
Dog #1: Little Gem
is a: Black Mini Bitch
Born: 16 Mar 2011
Location: Beverley, East Yorkshire

Re: Improving your photpgraphy- Mikes Handy Guide.

Post by Judi Ibbotson » 24 Jun 2012, 21:57

Thanks Mike great stuff, will copy and study.
Judi & the lovely Little Gem

User avatar
jaegervalder
Member
Posts: 1357
Joined: 21 Mar 2011, 08:57
First Name: Kathleen
Dog #1: Schnapps
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 25 Oct 2006
Dog #2: Darcie
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 29 Dec 2006
Dog #3: Juno
Born: 0- 0-2010
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Location: Brighton, Hove actually!

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by jaegervalder » 24 Jun 2012, 23:09

Just what we needed after purchasing our new camera! Many thanks!
Schnapps , the lovely big sister to mental Darcie , the untouchable
and now introducing Juno Lucina Sparkle Marzipan Sunshine.....a big name for a big dog!!
and Kathleen! (Oh and Mel, OH!)

User avatar
Eddie
Moderator
Posts: 5297
Joined: 07 Jan 2008, 17:35
First Name: Graham
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by Eddie » 25 Jun 2012, 08:15

This is a good guide, I'll make it a "sticky".
Graham, Judie, Eddie (19-03-07 to 25-07-12), Mouse, Daisy and little Reilly. Image

User avatar
angieh
Member
Posts: 2065
Joined: 04 Feb 2011, 15:19
First Name: Angie
Dog #1: Monty
is a: P/S Mini Dog
Born: 28 Feb 2011
Location: Hampshire/West Sussex border

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by angieh » 25 Jun 2012, 09:37

Thanks Mike - I will certainly read your guide but will take it in smaller bites .......... grand you've made it a sticky Graham, thanks for that too.

User avatar
BeeBee
Member
Posts: 7550
Joined: 18 Dec 2010, 08:09
First Name: Janetta
Location: France
Contact:

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by BeeBee » 25 Jun 2012, 11:19

Brilliant, thanks Mike, will spend proper amounts of time using this over the next few weeks. Very generous of you to put your time into this. :)
Jasmine (RIP) Renae b.01.11.10, sister to Susie-Belle (RIP), Twinkle (RIP), Cerise & Albert Claude puppy farm rescues, my muses
Creator of Schnauzerfest a good thing made possible by 1000s of good people & dogs
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Susie-Be ... 0289434936
http://www.janettaharvey.com/

hart
Member
Posts: 617
Joined: 17 Feb 2011, 20:02
First Name: odette

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by hart » 25 Jun 2012, 12:54

thanks mike you're a gem :D

User avatar
curzon
Member
Posts: 853
Joined: 02 Dec 2008, 14:58
First Name: Glyn
Dog #1: Lilly
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 10 Jan 2011
Location: Cheshire

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by curzon » 25 Jun 2012, 20:49

Once again Mike .... :ymapplause: ^:)^
Glyn - Lilly (P&S mini)

Don't cry because it's over; smile because it happened.

Our beloved Primrose 29/10/04 to 16/04/12 Run free our sweet little P


UNTIL ONE HAS LOVED A SCHNAUZER, A PART OF ONE'S SOUL REMAINS UNAWAKENED

User avatar
curzon
Member
Posts: 853
Joined: 02 Dec 2008, 14:58
First Name: Glyn
Dog #1: Lilly
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 10 Jan 2011
Location: Cheshire

Re: Improving your photography - Mikes Handy Guide

Post by curzon » 25 Jun 2012, 21:45

I am going to try some of these tips next weekend ..... thanks Mike
Glyn - Lilly (P&S mini)

Don't cry because it's over; smile because it happened.

Our beloved Primrose 29/10/04 to 16/04/12 Run free our sweet little P


UNTIL ONE HAS LOVED A SCHNAUZER, A PART OF ONE'S SOUL REMAINS UNAWAKENED

Post Reply