Wasp and Bee Stings

Suffering from a bee sting, runny tummy, cut into the nail quick or had a little mishap around the house, then you can find some friendly advice here on how to deal with life's little accidents and help your dog recover quickly or calm them down, so you can get them to the vet. If in any doubt about an illness or injury, please contact your vet as soon as possible.
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All the information provided in the First Aid section is gathered from the collective experience of our members and is provided for information purposes only. The advice contained within this section is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice, care, diagnosis or treatment. Each dog is different and may react differently to the recommended first aid advice. If you suspect your pet has a medical condition, you should consult your vet as soon as possible. You use this First Aid advice entirely at your own risk. If in doubt, speak to your Vet.
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Dawnspell
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Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Dawnspell » 22 Feb 2014, 14:18

Please note as my vet advised, if it is the first time your dog has been stung by wasp or bee it is important they see a vet after first aid as they can go into anaphylactic shock as the poison dose is a lot higher for a 10kg dog compared to the same sting on a human.

It is important to know whether the sting was Wasp or Bee as one is acid the other alkali so wrong treatment can aggravate further.
Wasp sting bathe area with vinegar
Bee sting treat area with a paste of baking soda or bicarb
Piriton can be given at a dose of 5ml liquid or half tablet per 10kg of dog

Any body with anything to add please do so.
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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Maty » 22 Feb 2014, 15:29

Great advice - also applies to human stings ;)

Also worth adding is that if there are several stings, which can happen if they disturb a wasps nest for example, always seek vet treatment ASAP.
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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Nika C » 22 Feb 2014, 15:39

Good advice, I have just thought I can never remember which way round the acid/alkaline thing is so I'm going to laminate a little note with it on and put it in the doggy first aid kit for very quick reference!

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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Maty » 23 Feb 2014, 06:40

My Mum always taught me Winegar for Wasps, BiCarb for Bee's and it is one of those silly sayings that has stuck in my head :D
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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Cat M » 23 Feb 2014, 07:47

Maty wrote:My Mum always taught me Winegar for Wasps, BiCarb for Bee's and it is one of those silly sayings that has stuck in my head :D
Same here!! :D
Last year Lola disturbed a wasps nest in the hollow of a fallen tree. She screamed :( :( (the only time I have ever heard her do this :( ) I was really glad my OH was on the walk with us as he instantly realised what had happened and rugby taggled her to get the waps off. The wasps were really vicious, you could see them repeatedly trying to sting her and clinging onto her. She definitely had gone into panic/flight mode. The vinegar did the trick though :-bd aswell as lots of cuddles :ymhug:

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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Grzyby15 » 25 May 2015, 12:25

Poor doggie, sending my love:)

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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by ZigiZagi » 13 Sep 2015, 18:42

Oh poor doggie! I hate wasp and bee strings!

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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Firefly » 13 Sep 2015, 20:55

I'm not sure I agree with your vet about the need to always see a vet. I have had a number of dogs over the years who have been stung. On one occasion one of my dogs did indeed go into an anaphylactic shock, it was very quick - I would say minutes, and she was violently sick and disorientated. Thankfully we were walking about 10minutes from our house and the vets was on the way back. We called in and the vet saw to her immediately and advised that a subsequent sting could be fatal and would need emergency treatment. We have had three stings this year, and although painful, there have been no other symptoms and no vet visits. I absolutely agree they need to be closely monitored of course and love the quote about which to use :)

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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Dawnspell » 14 Sep 2015, 06:56

Firefly wrote:I'm not sure I agree with your vet about the need to always see a vet.
Not sure if it was mine or Kates comment about vet you're commenting on. Should have said my vet said Always see a vet if its the first time they've been stung in case of anaphylactic shock.
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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Wookie Woo » 14 Sep 2015, 09:16

Maty wrote:My Mum always taught me Winegar for Wasps, BiCarb for Bee's and it is one of those silly sayings that has stuck in my head :D
I'm the same "winegar waspies" "BiCarb bee's" Wookie got stung by a wasp in July when we were on a lovely walk with a friend and her dog, all of a sudden Wookie did the funny schnauzer walk (you know the sort, running flat out then uh oh I've got a tiny little leaf on my back leg ;) and must stop immediately) I could see the bloody wasp on her right side above her tail, she didn't yelp squeak or anything but her tail went straight down and stayed down till about 8pm that evening.
Of course I didn't have any vinegar with me and did think about popping into the pub that we had to walk past to ask if I could have some vinegar but I didn't. I keep a couple of Chlorpheniramine 4mg tablets in my doggy treat bag which is always with me on walks (a long with a few plasters & antiseptic wipes) so I got the tablet out and made the decision to give Wookie who is 8.25-8.4kg just a quarter of a tablet, she was fine and back to normal with her tail up again within 3-4 hours.
We're going to Cornwall this Saturday for a week and will have a tub of BiCarb in amongst Wookie's supplies.
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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by zeta1454 » 14 Sep 2015, 17:53

Anaphylactic shock in dogs will occur almost immediately after being stung if they are sensitive to this and the reaction is obvious. They will need emergency treatment as quickly as possible and will be likely to have a fatal reaction if stung on another occasion. These are the symptoms:

"Anaphylactic reactions occur almost immediately – usually within moments after a dog touches, inhales, ingests or otherwise is exposed to the inciting allergen. The first signs of anaphylactic shock in dogs usually include very rapid onset of one or more of the following:

Diarrhea
Defecation
Urination
Vomiting
Itchiness (pruritis)
Development of hives (urticaria)
These symptoms quickly progress to one or more of the following:

Weakness
Lethargy
Drooling (hypersalivation)
Shallow, rapid and difficult breathing (respiratory distress; dyspnea)
Pale gums and other mucous membranes
Elevated heart rate (tachycardia)
Weak pulses
Cold limbs
Changes in mental clarity (excitement or depression)
Left untreated, the end result of anaphylactic shock almost always is seizures, collapse, coma and death. Dogs suffering anaphylactic episodes normally do not have severe or obvious swelling around their throat or face, unless the allergen came into contact with the dog in that area. Dogs having hypersensitivity reactions to allergens such as bee stings, vaccines or other pharmaceutical injections may develop mild to moderate swelling or bruising around the entry site. If any or even some of these signs appear suddenly in your dog, take him or her to a veterinarian right away. Anaphylactic shock is almost always fatal if not treated immediately."

If your dog has been stung just once and in distress but not anaphylactic ( the anaphylactic reaction is unmistakeable and immediate) you probably do not need veterinary treatment just the appropriate remedies as suggested above and lots of TLC :)
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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Firefly » 14 Sep 2015, 18:15

Not sure if it was mine or Kates comment about vet you're commenting on. Should have said my vet said Always see a vet if its the first time they've been stung in case of anaphylactic shock.
Hi Dawnspell, it was your comment, because the anaphylactic shock is thankfully relatively rare and the symptoms are so extreme that it's not just a trip to the vet that is required, it is emergency treatment that needs immediate action. In our case it was literally moments and the vet said we were lucky to have got her there so quickly.
I think a general statement which suggests symptoms need veterinary diagnosis and could be missed is misleading. I would rather say that any sting needs to be very closely monitored for symptoms and any sign acted on immediately.
Someone I met recently referring to her work with wasp stings on humans, mentioned that the affect was cumulative and therefore several stings in a short period of time eg over a few days, can also trigger an extreme reaction, which is why I would continue to look for symptoms after any sting.

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Re: Wasp and Bee Stings

Post by Fergus » 22 Jan 2018, 22:32

Whe I was 15 I hit my head on a wasps nest hanging from a branch. My aunt who I was staying with reconned I had been stung hundreds of times on my head face and hands.
My head was numb for days.

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