Deafness

BARF refers to Biologically Appropriate Raw food or Bones and Raw Food. It is where owners have decided to feed their Schnauzer a natural diet of raw meat, bones, and organs. If you are considering this for your Schnauzer, you will find lots of handy tips here.
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Ollybear
Posts: 3
Joined: 13 Mar 2019, 19:04
First Name: Gill

Deafness

Post by Ollybear »

Hi everyone!
My miniature schnauzer, Olly is 12 yrs and 6 months old.
Like many miniature schnauzer's he cam be quite naughty, good fun and at times quite stubborn, yet absolutely gorgeous 😍!
I'm not sure whether he is deaf? Or paryial deaf, or, just ignoring me!
Any loud bands (like tonight!) used to upset him. He does tend to (I think) some awareness of loud noises.
I shout him (inside the house) and, he seems to ignore me, most of the time. He is slightly more responsive out doors.
Is there a specific method/test to diagnose levels of deafness ?
Any ideas?
Love to you all. X
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zeta1454
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Posts: 5140
Joined: 19 May 2011, 16:58
First Name: Leigh
Dog #1: Magic
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 20 Apr 2010
Dog #2: Trilby
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Born: 15 Mar 2012
Dog #3: Pip
Born: 21 Feb 2014
is a: P/S Mini Bitch
Location: North Yorkshire
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Re: Deafness

Post by zeta1454 »

Hi Gill - it is possible that Olly’s hearing is not as good now as it was when he was young. Older dogs in my experience also are more likely to ‘switch off’ from attention to things going around them and so will not respond to you calling some or most of the time. It is not necessarily either deafness or stubbornly ignoring you but just they are not as open to listening out for their human’s voice. We have an older dog that used to be very nervous when fireworks were set off or similar loud noises but she no longer reacts to them. However, there are occasions when she is very responsive to being called. She does also go into very deep sleep at times during the day and is oblivious to everything going on around her which would not have happened when she was younger.
There may be a test for deafness in dogs but really there is no ‘cure’ for this and, with an older dog especially, I would just try to accept that Olly is getting older now and (as with an older person) he may not hear very well and just needs more patience when it comes to communicating with him. You may have to get closer to him and get his attention that way rather than calling loudly :)
Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole. ~Roger Caras

Magic - Silversocks Sharade at Darksprite
Trilby - Darksprite Rosa Bud


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Dinkum
Tech Team
Posts: 2576
Joined: 10 Jan 2011, 12:47
First Name: Dean
Dog #1: Rupert RIP
is a: Black Mini Dog
Born: 24 Dec 2010
Dog #2: Watson
is a: Black Mini Dog
Born: 21 Feb 2012
Location: Tunbridge Wells, Kent

Re: Deafness

Post by Dinkum »

I have the same issue with Rupert. He has just turned 13. His hearing has slowly deteriorated over the last 18 months. If he is sleeping or not looking at me, he, more often than not, does not respond to his name. I have to give a loud whistle to get his attention and then he is immediately alert. On walks, I have to whistle loudly to get his attention, although he does not wander off too far anymore. Fireworks no longer bother him either.

I have just accepted it as a the process of him getting older.
Dean (Dog dad)
Rupert, black mini, 24/12/10 - 01/03/24
Watson, black mini born 21/02/12

I offer my advice freely, but I am not an expert, breeder, groomer or behaviourist. It is simply my experience of raising pups in a way that seems to make sense.
Ollybear
Posts: 3
Joined: 13 Mar 2019, 19:04
First Name: Gill

Re: Deafness

Post by Ollybear »

Thankyou so much for both your replies regarding my Olly.
Your understanding and knowledge have certainly helped me to feel less anxious about the relationship between older Miniature Schnauzer and hearing issues.
Thankyou X
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